County Updating Stormwater Regs

County Updating Stormwater Regs
A common complaint in LV: after a neighbor’s home gets replaced by a spec developer surrounding yards get flooded when it rains.
  Responding to increasing flooding and rampant development, the County plans to change its stormwater management regulations for single-family home construction projects. Developers are, of course, unhappy. The proposed changes are to be published in July and take effect in Sept 2021.
  The county surveyed neighbors, home builders and engineers in 2019 and met with engineers early this year. The County found that soil under new homes is 10 times less permeable than the soil under existing homes.
County Land Disturbing Activity (LDA) webpage Announcement of LDA 2.0 Program Upgrade LDA Summary Slide Deck ARLnowStormwaterManagement@arlingtonva.us

Apr 12: LVCA General Meeting: Water Mains & Zoning “Bonus” Heights

LVCA Meeting: Water Mains & Zoning “Bonus” Heights, Apr 12
When: Monday Apr 12, 8PM
Where: Virtual via Zoom

ONLINE ONLY: No meeting at the Community House
A link to the meeting will be emailed to LVCA broadcast email subscribers on the event day (Apr 12)

Key Boulevard Water Main Replacement
County staff will brief us on replacement of the water main along Key Blvd from Jackson to Danville and the block of Herndon north of Key. The existing, aging water main was built in 1927 and has had numerous breaks in the past few years. The new larger-diameter and more-durable watermain will improve fire flow capacity and better support demand in the neighborhood. Construction is expected begin in the Spring and is expected to take a year and a half. There will be detours, parking restrictions, and unavoidable noise (between 9AM & 4PM). Water service may be disrupted for up to two hours. when the new main is connected to the water system disruptions may last up to eight hours. Advance notice will be given to residents before any planned water shut-offs. County Board Agenda Item

Zoning “Bonus” Heights in LV
In the second part of the meeting county staff will provide an overview of a proposal to award 60 extra feet of height for new buildings that include affordable units. The proposal is ostensibly for projects that are 100% “affordable,” but gives the County Board leeway offer extra height even if a project isn’t completely affordable. The proposal applies to properties zoned RA14-26, RA8-18, and RA6-15. There are several RA8-18 districts in Lyon Village (shown on map in yellow). This could potentially allow 10 story buildings to be built next to single-family homes. The proposal is supported by County Staff, the County Manager, and the Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing. The county board has advertised a hearing on April 17 to approve this change.
Click map to enlarge
Sun Gazette Washington Business Journal County Staff Presentation County Board Agenda Item Zoning Map Zoning Ordinance 2020 Letter of Support (Arlington Partnership for Affordable Housing)

March Meeting Recap: Clarendon Development Plans

March Meeting Recap: Clarendon Development Plans
County planner Brett Wallace, who is project manager for the Clarendon Sector Plan (CSP) Update, reviewed the current status of work on the update. The plan has shaped the physical development of Clarendon over the past 14 years, including private development projects and major public investments like the Clarendon Circle transportation improvements. Several large developments are currently proposed in Clarendon, including redevelopment of key sites south of Washington Boulevard, reconfiguration or relocation of Fire Station 4, several high-rise residential buildings, and a convention hotel. Changes to the plan may have a significant impact on traffic, parking, trash, and safety in LV.

CSP Presentation Slides

CSP Presentation Audio


Q&A
How does the Sector Plan update relate to the County’s “Missing Middle” initiative and proposed changes to zoning?


Are you discussing moving Wilson Boulevard a few feet South into the Silver Diner block between Clarendon Circle and 10th Street N, so as to provide more sidewalk space on the North side of the street, where Northside Social is currently located?


It is widely acknowledged that there are limits to growth. Will you consider limits on Clarendon’s infrastructure? Streets and sidewalks in Clarendon are narrower than Rosslyn or Ballston. Is there a limit to what can be reasonably built in this area?


How will the proposed projects taper down to the residential neighborhoods — particularly on the 10th Street side where you are very close to Ashton Heights and Lyon Park?


Are any parcels north of Wilson and Washington Blvds. in play in your study? Parking in Clarendon is tight and spills over into Lyon Village. Are any thoughts be given to increasing the parking requirement — the County seems to be reducing it to about 0.46 spaces per unit in residential buildings.


How much more density has been added above the current density under the 2006 Sector Plan in the four private project proposals? Their presentations don’t seem to list the original density nor the additional square footage they have requested.


What is a modified step back?


On the St. Charles side of Washington Blvd. opposite the Bromptons, the proposal is to keep the edge of the site at 55 feet and then taper up more rapidly than currently planned. Yet this is the lowest part of the site, and elevations are typically measured based on the whole site. What would be the likely height at that point with an average site elevation of 70 feet or more?


Is there not enough parking in Clarendon, or is it just a matter of folks not wanting to use the public parking garages?


A convention hotel is proposed for the Silver Diner site. The transportation needs for a hotel are very different than those for a residential building or office building. How would you keep traffic from cars, shuttle vans, and tour buses from spilling out into the neighborhoods?


How many of these sites will include residential that will cater to families? where will those children go?


Dittmar is currently proposing to remove seventy-five homes from our housing supply by converting them to short/medium-term rentals across three of their buildings (not in the subject area, but nearby) in a “minor” site plan amendment. What is the County doing (through this sector plan amendment or anywhere else) to compensate the community for the removal of those 75 homes, especially in the context of our housing shortage?


Will the fire department station and office building remain? Will their current activities continue? Will any of it need to be moved?


When will the Joyce Motors site be bringing something to the Board?


Fast-Moving Developer Demolishes Historic House

Fast-Moving Developer Demolishes Historic House
Community associations once again prove to be no match for well-funded developers and a county government oriented toward development. The Dominion Hills Civic Association lost its long-running effort to preserve the Civil-War era Febrey-Lothrop House. The nine-acre property is now expected to be developed. While currently zoned for single-family homes, local residents are worried because affordable housing advocates are pushing for higher-density affordable housing, which residents call “inconsistent with our neighborhood.” Story at ARLnow

Apartment Space to Hotel Conversion

Apartment Space to Hotel Conversion
Despite allegations of an Arlington “housing crisis” the County Board is expected to allow another developer to temporarily convert apartment space to hotel use. The developer of 1555 Wilson Blvd wants to convert 5 floors of residential units into a hotel because they are expected to remain vacant for a long time. County Board is expected to advertise a public hearing on the matter for April. Sun Gazette County’s Project Page

Comment Sought on Market Common Plaza Changes

Comment Sought on Market Common Plaza Changes
The Market Common Plaza, at N Edgewood & Clarendon Blvd, is planning a major redesign that would remove nearly half of its on-street parking. This will potentially spill more traffic into adjacent neighborhoods, which now have fewer protections under the revised Residential Parking Program (RPP). Nearby LV residents wrote the County Board about existing problems, which the County Board chose to not address.
  Regency Centers now is seeking the required community engagement on its proposed changes. The plan goes before County commissions in mid-April and the County Board April 27. Video of Draft Design and Comment Form
P.S. Clarendon Market Common has been renamed by the developer as The Crossing Clarendon.

Mar 8: LVCA General Meeting: Clarendon Sector Plan

LVCA General Meeting: Clarendon Sector Plan, March 8
When: Monday March 8, 8PM
Where: Virtual via Zoom

ONLINE ONLY: There is no meeting at the Community House.
A link to the meeting will be emailed to all subscribers to the LVCA broadcast email on the day of the event (Mar 8)

Police Update
The meeting starts with an update by Captain Scott Linder and the Arlington County Community Policing Team on police activity in and around Lyon Village and Clarendon over the last 2 months. Followed by an opportunity to ask questions.

Clarendon Sector Plan Update
The meeting continues with a look at the on-going update to the Clarendon Sector Plan. The Plan was last updated in 2006. Changes to the Clarendon Sector Plan may have a significant impact on traffic, parking, trash, and safety in LV. Brett Wallace of Arlington County staff, who is overseeing the update, will present.
Clarendon Sector Plan 2006 APA Great Places
Click to Continue Reading…

Huge Developments Planned in Clarendon

Huge Developments Planned in Clarendon
Initial plans for a redevelopment called Bingham Center will replace the Silver Diner and The Lot in Clarendon. The development plans 2 buildings: a ten-story, 224-room hotel at the Silver Diner location and a 286-unit residential building where The Lot is currently located. The development includes 15,000 square feet of street-level retail. The hotel will include 6,000 square feet of meeting space.
   South of Bingham Center, at the intersection of N Irving and 10th St, another developer has proposed an 11-story mixed-use building with at least 200 apartments. ARLnow

Most RPP Changes Approved by County Board

Most RPP Changes Approved by County Board
The County Board, in a session lasting over 2 hours, approved an overhaul of the County’s popular Residential Permit Parking (RPP) Program despite numerous objections from residents and civic associations. Letters from a dozen civic associations were received with only one expressing broad support. Letters from over 100 residents were also received. Unfortunately the County Board failed to publish any resident’s letters; 23 resident’s letters in opposition were CC’d to LVCA.

The Board voted unanimously to adopt most of the unpopular revisions. Changes will go into effect in April; current permits and passes expire July 1.

The LVCA Board thanks all residents and officers of civic associations who sent letters and testified about RPP to the County Board. Hopefully there will be future opportunities to correct the problems these changes create.

Community Wins
● Paid 2-hour parking by anyone rejected
● Existing RPP locations & hours unchanged
● More households eligible to apply for RPP

Community Losses
● Limit households with driveways to 2 permits
● Potential permit price increase to cover full cost of program (may double)
● Grant permit eligibility to many kinds of non-residents
● Low-cost all-zones permits for developers
● Exempts car-share vehicles from all RPP restrictions (24-hour limit)
● Street must be an absurd 85% full to apply for RPP (was 75%)
● Petition must be signed by an absurd 80% of street residents (was 60%)
● Unclear ability to make adjustments as congestion problems increase
● Offloads private costs (developers, bars, etc.) onto the community
● No consideration of other means to solve purported parking problems
● Poor community outreach to review proposal accepted by Board
● Refusal to meet with civic associations to review proposal accepted by Board
● Discarding of most “social and environmental” RPP objectives
● Open RPP to legal challenge by discarding SCOTUS protection

County News Release
Letters from Civic Associations
Video of County Board Meeting RPP starts at 51:00

Do Proposed RPP Changes Make It Illegal?

Do Proposed RPP Changes Make It Illegal?
At the Feb 15 Open Door Monday session hosted by County Board Member Libby Garvey, one of the participants (who is a lawyer) raised a potential legal problem if the County makes the proposed changes to the Residential Permit Parking Program (RPP).

The proposed changes declare the current RPP preamble, “Purpose and Intent,” to be “secondary” and seek to substitute a different primary purpose: to “manage parking demand.”

The RPP program’s current intent language refers to issues like litter, air pollution, and improvements in air quality, reducing congestion and/or hazardous traffic conditions in the neighborhood, increasing the use of public mass transit. However, these are secondary benefits of the RPP program.

County Board Agenda Item See page 4
RPP Preambles Compared (PDF)

The Virginia Supreme Court held that the ordinance violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. However, this was reversed by the United States Supreme Court citing its “social and environmental” objectives.

The United States Supreme Court quoted the preamble, “Intent and Purpose” at length in explaining its decision to uphold the RPP. Replacing the RPP’s preamble should be viewed as a legislative “third rail.” Arlington County Board v. Richards(1977)

The Supreme Court decision made the current RPP a national model for neighborhood conservation. Sadly County staff seek to go in a different direction as step by step Arlington moves away from being a model for the nation.

Suggested Resident Letter About RPP

Suggested Resident Letter About RPP
The following letter may assist LV residents in voicing opposition to the proposed changes to the RPP.

The County is proposing changes to the Residential Permit Parking Program (Zone 6 for Lyon Village). The proposed changes will make the program less effective for Lyon Village and much harder to enforce. The proposed changes declare the current Purpose and Intent of the RPP to be “secondary benefits” and seek to substitute a primary purpose to “manage parking demand.”


County Board will meet about RPP Sat, Feb 20 at 8:30AM
Letters must submitted to the County Board no later than noon on the Wednesday before the Saturday Regular Meeting to be posted online with the agenda.
To comment on these changes, contact the County Board members:
● Matt de Ferranti, Chairman, Arlington County Board
Email: MdeFerranti@Arlingtonva.us
● Katie Cristol, Vice Chair, Arlington County Board
Email: KCristol@arlingtonva.us
● Christian Dorsey, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: CDorsey@arlingtonva.us
● Takis P. Karantonis, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: TKarantonis@arlingtonva.us
● Libby Garvey, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: LGarvey@arlingtonva.us
● General County Board Email
Email: CountyBoard@arlingtonva.us


Sample Letter

Dear County Board Member :

The current Permit Parking Program (RPP) has been successful in protecting our streets from commuter and other parking. It has helped to reduce traffic in residential neighborhoods and has contributed to pedestrian safety and improved quality of the environment. The proposed changes to the plan go against all of the stated goals of the program.

A serious problem with the proposed changes to the RPP is allowing two-hour paid parking in all restricted parking zones. This is particularly egregious without having a transparent means in place to enforce the paid parking limit. Arlington County staff has indicated that the County would be unable to enforce it. Once the word gets out that the County can’t enforce two hour paid parking, people will forgo paying to park in the commercial areas and head for the neighborhoods. Residents across the county would be irate when they see people parked on neighborhood streets for long periods of time and with no means to have it enforced.

Many of our streets are narrow and not designed to be full of parked cars. Space is needed for cars to pass each other; the neighbors know this and park accordingly. If instead these streets are full of parked cars it will be harder to drive on those streets creating unsafe conditions for pedestrians, bikes and cars and for Emergency vehicles responding to calls. This is a safety issue.

Providing additional parking would also further promote use of motorized vehicles, greenhouse gases emissions, and handicap the county’s efforts to promote a “no car diet” and alternative forms of transportation.

Neighborhoods in Arlington are different. What works in one neighborhood may not work in another. The “one size fits all” approach taken in the proposed revisions to the RPP will not work in all locations.

I urge the County Board to vote no on the proposed changes to the Residential Permit Parking Plan.

Thank you for your consideration.

Ideas: Letters Submitted About RPP

Ideas: Letters Submitted About RPP
The following letters may assist LV residents in voicing opposition to the proposed changes to the RPP.

The County is proposing changes to the Residential Permit Parking Program (Zone 6 for Lyon Village). The proposed changes will make the program less effective for Lyon Village and much harder to enforce. The proposed changes declare the current Purpose and Intent of the RPP to be “secondary benefits” and seek to substitute a primary purpose to “manage parking demand.”


Letters must submitted to the County Board no later than noon on the Wednesday before the Saturday Regular Meeting to be posted online with the agenda.


LVCA Letter to County Planning Commission(PDF)

LVCA Statement at Planning Commission Meeting

BVSCA Letter to County Planning Commission (PDF)

BVSCA Statement at Planning Commission Meeting

The proposed changes minimize the original Purpose and Intent of the RPP…
RPP Preambles Compared (PDF)


Dear Mr. Lantleme:

I have just become aware of proposed changes to the RPP program. Quite frankly, I am astounded by the proposal to encourage commuter and commercial parking in low-density residential areas close to high-density areas. It seems to go against everything that Arlington planning has claimed to support such as a “car free diet,” prioritized use of public transportation, bicycling, etc. Many a site plan lessened parking requirements for businesses and apartments with the assumption that public transportation would be used instead. As a community, we accepted that tradeoff, because our residential streets had the benefit of the RPP program. Now the aim appears to be to shift parking from commercial lots and streets to our residential neighborhoods. It is completely unjust to exempt businesses from providing parking and shift parking to residential streets instead.

I truly find it shocking that residential streets would be opened up for 2-hour metered parking. The proposal appears to effectively end the RPP program and do nothing more than allow residents to compete with 2-hour parkers for a spot at the reduced price of an annual permit. I doubt that we would be able to find a space under such circumstances as it is still difficult even with the restrictions.

I am also strongly opposed to limiting the number of permanent permits. Even though we as a family commute by Metro and put very few miles on our cars, we have multiple cars. Houses of our vintage in Lyon village often have driveways, but a double driveway is rare; having 2-3 cars is not rare. One has to park on the street. I am more than happy to pay 100% of the fee to prevent juggling of cars in an 8-foot-wide drive and avoid getting a parking ticket on my own street because only 1 vehicle-specific permit would be allowed. Especially when FlexPasses are so easily lost when changing cars. An increase in price is the only change I could support regarding the number/price of passes.

Additionally, we were able to get extended hours for restrictions, which I understand would no longer be permitted. Although it causes us a hardship when having visitors, it has been instrumental to our quality of life. Being next to a late-night bar scene means parking is sought well into the night. If 2-hour parking is allowed by anyone without a permit, finding close parking in the evening would most likely be impossible. And that doesn’t touch upon the secondary issues caused by bar patrons that led us to seek 24-hour restrictions.

I urge you to abandon these changes and go back to the drawing board. I urge Arlington to continue to encourage the use of public transportation, walking, biking, instead of turning our low-density neighborhoods into a parking lot for commuters and commercial businesses—especially when those businesses have been exempted from providing the full amount of parking that they otherwise would be required to have.


Dear Mr. Lantelme, Planning Commission Chair

As you consider the proposed revisions to the RPP I urge you to be a good neighbor too. Please also look at the Report as a neighborhood resident and a former LVCA president.

The proposed changes are full of subtile changes that will seriously degrade the benefits of the RPP. The RPP is not so much about parking as it is about our neighborhoods. Putting the review in the hands of the Parking Manager seriously skews the values embodied in the proposed revisions.

The RPP Report runs off the rails right at the start, with drastic changes the preamble of the Ordinance, “Purpose and Intent”. The review sweeps away all of the current purpose and intent of the RPP as “secondary” and substitutes “parking management.” This would be a serious policy change and such anti-neighborhood bias permeates the entirety of their analysis.

The proposed changes create numerous exceptions that make the ordinance effectively impossible to enforce. No one will know which exception applies to determine if a car is legally or illegally parked. Most of the exceptions are completely indeterminate by inspection of the vehicle. The Police Dept has already stated that the changes makes the Ordinance unenforceable. Yet the report sweeps this serious problem aside with claims of computer magic and does not even acknowledge the Police Dept’s determination.

The Report claims community outreach yet seeks to brush aside vigorous opposition from many neighborhood associations. I can not remember another case where the County has flatly refused to attend an LVCA meeting to explain their work. The community outreach has been nominal and inadequate for such serious changes.

The Report fails to consider alternatives that would not spill parking into the neighborhoods.

The Report fails to consider how changes will impact our many narrow streets that rely on space to pull over so two cars can safely pass.

The Report is deficient in many ways. The Report makes a number of sly assertions that should not be taken at face value. There are too many problems to list in this email.

In these strange economic times there is no pressing need to make changes now. Please consider that this faulty Report should be reviewed and revised by someone who is more familiar with our residential neighborhoods.

Thank you for your consideration,


Dear Planning Commission and County Board,

My main concerns with the proposed changes to the RPP Program are the enforcement of the two-hour parking and the parking by school staff around schools.

Currently, people frequently take a risk and park along my street without a permit. I’m sure in the future, many more people will take the risk of parking without paying or parking for longer than two hours. Now I can call the police and someone without a zone sticker can get a ticket. In the future, what will happen if I call the police? I’m assuming the police can somehow confirm if someone has paid and is still within their two-hour window. If the police can not do this, then how will they be able to enforce the two-hour parking?

As for school staff parking… Lyon Village worked with the Principal at the current Key School to decide on time-restricted street parking along Adams St and Key Blvd at the school to address parents blocking driveways, driving dangerously, ignoring Do Not Enter signs, etc., during pick-up and drop-off and to provide parking for parents who needed to be at the school during school hours.

I would want Lyon Village to work with the new school at the Key site to review the time-restricted parking along Adams St and Key Blvd, which could impact the location of where overflow staff could park. I would also want to identify the number of staff who would receive the newly proposed parking passes and help them find parking close to the school without overburdening particular streets or blocking elderly or handicapped neighbors from easy access to their homes.


Planning Commission:
Please accept these comments with regard to the proposed revisions for Arlington County’s Residential Parking Permit (RPP) Program.

As a resident of Lyon Village, my home is located one block off of Wilson Boulevard. On any given day, our residential block sees heavy traffic due to our proximity to Clarendon’s commercial area. While our home benefits from location and its quick access to shops, supermarkets and Metro, we are also burdened with the challenges of living in a high traffic area. Currently, and in spite of the pandemic, bars and restaurants on Wilson Boulevard continue to see a steady and hefty flow of patrons. During the day, customers visiting shops or restaurants find no-cost parking on our side streets. On many nights, revelers returning to their vehicles from the bars and restaurants awaken our households. On a regular basis, we wake up on Saturday and Sunday mornings to remove cans and bottles that are left behind on our curbs and directly on our properties from individuals in route to their parked vehicles. Like many Lyon Village residents, we deal with these challenges and disruptions because we love our neighbors and being a part of this special community.

This is why it is so important that some of the current measures like 8am-1am parking restrictions are upheld. The proposed RPP changes such as allowing two-hour parking without appropriate enforcement will increase vehicular traffic and congestion in our neighborhoods, turn residential blocks into parking havens for patrons and commuters and further burden the day-to-day living of residents. In addition, the proposed revisions have the potential to negatively impact our properties and the safety of our community. Undoubtedly, more traffic, more congestion and more late-night congregating will increase littering, noise and disorderly conduct in our residential neighborhoods.

As 5-year residents of Arlington County, we urge the Planning Commission to take no action on the proposed changes at this time. Thank you for your attention and consideration.


Good morning,

Please do not make the proposed changes to the Residential Parking Permit program in Arlington’s Zone 6. My sister and I grew up on Highland St across from Lyon Village park in the 1970s, when the area was so quiet you could sled down our hill and onto the street. It is wonderful to see the neighborhood grow and prosper, but not at the expense of quality of life.

The car traffic is formidable in Zone 6, especially around the shopping districts but also farther away. People zip across the side streets between Key and Wilson at dangerous speeds sometimes – hence the traffic circles and safety bumps. It is also very difficult to find parking near the Metro. It will only become more so after the pandemic, especially if the proposed RPP changes go through.

My family supports the Lyon Village Citizens’ Association stance on RPP changes.

Thank you for your time.


RPP Hearing Needs Your Voices (Updated)

RPP Hearing Needs Your Voices (Updated)
The County is proposing changes to the Residential Permit Parking Program (Zone 6 for Lyon Village). The proposed changes will make the program less effective for Lyon Village and much harder to enforce. The proposed changes declare the current Purpose and Intent of the RPP to be “secondary benefits” and seek to substitute a primary purpose to “manage parking demand.”

Without a vigorous response from Residents these changes will likely be accepted by the County Board with little consideration of the negative impact on Residents. Please send your comments to the County Board and please let us know by sending a CC of your emails to RPP@LyonVillage.org

Background Information
RPP Presentation: Jan 11 2021 by Andy Rude (PDF)
LVCA Letter to County Planning Commission(PDF)
Current Ordinance (PDF) Scroll down to Article VIII, 12.2-98
Full Text of County RPP Proposal Draft (PDF)
Residential Permit Parking (LVCA General Meeting Recap)

Planning Commission Hearing of Feb 8
The Planning Commission met to consider RPP on Feb 8. The 3-1/2 hour marathon session got bogged down in minutia and gave short shrift to many issues raised by residents and neighborhood associations, including LVCA.
● A staff presentation and statements by residents and neighborhood associations, including LVCA, occupied the first hour.
● The Commission spent an hour debating the allotment of parking permits based on whether households have driveways/garages or not: 2 permits for those with and 4 for those without.
● The Commission spent an hour debating whether parking in restricted zones should be available to anyone for 2-hours upon payment of a fee using an online app. This was accepted subject to evaluation on a block-by-block basis and if minimal enforcement was provided.
● One good idea coming from the hearing was their realization that Arlington is full of special situations so the one-size-fits-all approach taken by the RPP revision is not appropriate. Unfortunately, though discussed, it was not reflected in their final resolution.
Watch Meeting Video
Final Planning Commission Resolution on RPP
Story at ARLnow

County Board will meet about RPP Sat, Feb 20 at 8:30AM
Letters must submitted to the County Board no later than noon on the Wednesday before the Saturday Regular Meeting to be posted online with the agenda.
To comment on these changes, contact the County Board members:
● Matt de Ferranti, Chairman, Arlington County Board
Email: MdeFerranti@Arlingtonva.us
● Katie Cristol, Vice Chair, Arlington County Board
Email: KCristol@arlingtonva.us
● Christian Dorsey, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: CDorsey@arlingtonva.us
● Takis P. Karantonis, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: TKarantonis@arlingtonva.us
● Libby Garvey, Member, Arlington County Board
Email: LGarvey@arlingtonva.us
● General County Board Email
Email: CountyBoard@arlingtonva.us
County Board Members (webpage)
Watch Live Board Meetings and Past Meetings

● Stephen Crim, Parking Manager, Arlington County

Email: SCrim@Arlingtonva.us
Our experience is that Mr. Crim does not expeditiously respond to emails

County Board Virtual Open Door Mondays
Open Door Mondays offer Arlingtonians an opportunity to speak one-on-one, or in small groups, with a County Board Member in an informal setting. Two opportunities before the Board meets: Feb 8 & 15. Must sign up online starting 8AM of the previous Tuesday.
ODM FAQ
The Open Door Monday registration form is active from 8AM each Tuesday to the following Monday of the ODM session at 5PM. Upon submitting your registration, further instructions and meeting details will be emailed to you.
● Feb 8 7-9PM RSVP (online form)
● Feb 15 7-9PM RSVP (online form)

LVCA Takes Stand on RPP

LVCA Takes Stand on RPP
The County is proposing changes to the Residential Permit Parking Program (Zone 6 for LV). The proposed changes will make the program less effective for LV and much harder to enforce.

LVCA has been collaborating with other civic associations, including Ballston-Virginia Square, Aurora Highlands, and Clarendon-Courthouse. There is broad consensus among these civic associations and we support our fellow associations in their positions and concerns.
LVCA Letter to County Planning Commission(PDF)

Missing Middle Listening Session: Feb 4

Missing Middle Listening Session
When: Feb 4 at 7PM
Where: Online via Microsoft Teams

Possibly the greatest future challenge facing Lyon Village residents will be proposals to up-zone much on Lyon Village, now mostly single-family houses, to permit additional duplexes, triplexes, quads, and denser structures, thus dramatically changing the character of Lyon Village.

Share thoughts with County staff on priorities and considerations on the Missing Middle Housing Study. The meeting will be a forum to discuss your ideas with other community members, provide feedback, and learn more.

Link for Feb 4 Meeting Announcement

LVCA Meeting Recap Video: Missing Middle

Red Top Site: Shorter Building, More Units

Red Top Site: Shorter Building, More Units

Red Top Redevelopment (click to enlarge)
The Red Top site project, between 13th St, N Hudson, and Washington Blvd has amended its plans to shorten the 10-story building on Washington Blvd and shift its mass to lower floors. The number of residential units increased from 247 to 269 units. Units will be studios and 1 or 2 bedrooms. The amendment awaits approval by the county Planning Commission. Ground has not yet broken on the project. Urban Turf

LVCA Meeting Recap Video: Missing Middle

LVCA Meeting Recap Video: Missing Middle (Nov 9)
Possibly the greatest future challenge facing Lyon Village Residents will be proposals to up-zone much on Lyon Village, now limited to single-family houses, to permit duplexes, triplexes, quads, and denser structures, thus dramatically changing the character of Lyon Village.

Speakers:
● Peter Rousselot from Arlingtonians for Our Sustainable Future made his case agains the Missing Middle Housing Study and up-zoning. (27 minutes)

● Matt de Ferranti, County Board Member explained the Missing Middle Housing Study. (20 minutes)

● Q by John & A by Matt & Peter. (25 minutes)

Missing Middle Housing Study
The Missing Middle Housing Study is expected to run through 2022. It will consider such topics as:
● Up-Zoning: Changing the zoning of areas now limited to single-family houses to permit duplexes, triplexes, quads, and denser structures.
● How up-zoning relates to Arlington’s agenda for accelerated development, growth, and density.
● Impacts of up-zoning, accelerated development, growth and density on Arlington’s infrastructure (public schools, fire stations, storm and freshwater distribution systems), environment, and budget.
Resources
County’s Missing Middle Web Page
Missing Middle Study Timeline
Missing Middle article published by Arlington Civic Assn
Arlington-Analytics Report on Missing Middle
“Missing Middle” Advocate Targets LV
Best Arlington Neighborhoods

“Missing Middle” Advocate Targets LV

“Missing Middle” Advocate Targets LV
Emily Hamilton, housing advocate and Director of the Urbanity Project at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University was quoted in ARLnow saying… “North of the Clarendon Metro station is the largest chunk of that quarter-mile circle where there is low-density housing… It’s certainly a spot where denser development would make economic sense.”… “There is a missing price point in Arlington both because of the county’s high-income and the region’s unwillingness — compared to other coastal regions — to permit multi-family housing.”

Most of Lyon Village south of Key is in the bullseye.

Nov 9 LVCA General Meeting Police & Missing Middle

LVCA General Meeting Police & Missing Middle: Nov 9
When: Mon, Nov 9, 8PM TONIGHT
Where: Virtual via Zoom About Zoom
ONLINE ONLY: There is no meeting at the Community House.

Police Update
The meeting will start with an update from LV’s Community Policing Team.

Missing Middle Housing Study
A discussion of Arlington’s, recently started, Missing Middle Housing Study that is expected to run through 2022.
● Up-Zoning: Changing the zoning of areas now limited to single-family houses to permit duplexes, triplexes, quads, and denser structures.
● How up-zoning relates to Arlington’s agenda for accelerated development, growth, and density.
● Impacts of up-zoning, accelerated development, growth and density on Arlington’s infrastructure (public schools, fire stations, storm and freshwater distribution systems), environment, and budget.
County’s Missing Middle Web Page
Missing Middle Study Timeline
MM Article published by Arlington Civic Assn
Arlington-Analytics Report on MM

Speakers:
● Peter Rousselot from Arlingtonians for Our Sustainable Future will make the case agains the Missing Middle Housing Study and up-zoning.
● The county has declined to provide anyone to explain their case for the Missing Middle Housing Study.

A link to the meeting will be emailed to all subscribers to the LVCA broadcast email on the day of the event (Nov 9); just click the link in the email to join the meeting. Please join the meeting a bit early, like 7:50 PM, so you will be ready when we start promptly at 8 PM. The meeting is limited to 100 attendees so latecomers may not be able to join.

Clarendon Sector Plan Review Begins

Clarendon Sector Plan Review Begins
The County has kicked off a review update process for the Clarendon Sector Plan, which was adopted in 2006. The study is immediately south of Lyon Village: bounded by Washington Blvd, North Hudson St., N 10th St & Wilson Blvd. What happens in Clarendon has a big impact about what happens in Lyon Village. An Engagement Session is scheduled for Oct 29.
Project Website
Project Documents
Virtual Walking Tour

Oct 28 Missing Middle Housing Study Begins

Missing Middle Housing Study Kick Off Event Online
When: Wed, Oct 28 at 7PM
Where: Online Meeting Website
The Missing Middle Housing Study will explore how new housing types could help address Arlington’s shortfall in housing supply and gaps in housing choices.
● What housing types are appropriate for Arlington?
● Where could new types of housing be located?
● What would the infrastructure and environmental impacts be? How could they be mitigated?
● How much would new types cost, and what impact would that have on Arlington’s housing market?

Tense Meeting on “Upzoning” Residential Areas

County Board members were queried about a planned study of zoning during a Jan 2 housing forum. At issue is the desire by some to “upzone” single-family neighborhoods to accommodate more properties. The goal is to keep costs of Arlington housing from growing unaffordable for middle-income residents.

A bill introduced for the 2020 General Assembly session would eliminate single-family zoning across all of Virginia.
Va House Bill 152 Would Ban Single-Family Residential Zoning

“None of us are interested in destroying all our single-family neighborhoods,” said new County Board Chairman Libby Garvey.

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